How to Use a Rifle Scope for Long Range Shooting

Written by Kevin Fleeman

Using your rifle for long range shooting is a skill you need to acquire a lot of practice. Accuracy in long range shooting is essential, and this is not very easy. The first thing you need is to know about your scope. You need to choose the best optics for your rifle. If your scope is not perfect, you will never get a good sight. There are lots of optics on the market with different features. You need to study and research about these features and buy a perfect one that suits you. Don’t rush through while making this choice. So you got the best optics for you now let’s proceed.

You got all your equipment set; now you get to a very suitable and stable position before shooting. The best position for this is to lie on the ground. Put your rifle in a heavy bag that is used by the professional shooter and the back of rifle on a sandbag to get a steady position for your rifle. If you don’t get to this stable situation, you are not likely to get an accurate shot. The long-range rifle shoots bullets hard, so it shakes a lot. You got to your stable to your stable position now time to adjust to your scope.

Long distance shooting usually requires the target to be more than 500yards. You need to have a good long range scope for this and take a look at our x-sight 2 review to get your best. Your own eye makes a natural focusing for, but you need to look through the scope reticle to make adjustments. You need to adjust more than once until the point when you get the reticle clear and correct.

Long Range Shooting Technique

Mounting

The main thing you have to do first is mounted your scope to your rifle. To achieve the best exactness from your file, the scope must be mounted appropriately. You should use a top notch mount with bases intended to fit your specific rifle. The extension ought to be installed as low as conceivable without touching either the barrel or the receiver. Before fixing the mount rings, look through the receiver of your regular shooting position.

Presently, it should be zero. Zeroing your scope means taking the point inside your scope to match with the point of impact of your bullet at target and the long distance. The distant here is very important. Making adjustments depends on the range of your goal. You cannot just rest while making the adjustment for once. You have to change it each time you get a different distant.

First Do a Trial Practice

Now, look through your scope at a certain point of your target. Now look with your bare eyes at the point and again through your scope as like I have said earlier. If you do this back and forth, you will get a clear idea how much adjustment you need to make. Now it’s time to make windage and elevation adjustment to get to right point through your scope.

When adjustments are done, shoot a couple of rounds after shooting go to the target sheet to see the point of impact. You will see the gap between your point of impact and the main target point. Now it’s time make the right adjustments by measuring this gap. Don’t do this just after making one shot or will not get to accurate adjustment.

You have shot a couple of rounds to make the adjustments. So it’s the right time for you move on to next step of zeroing your rifle scope. The zero range will depend on your hunting conditions.In general, if the greater part of your shots will be at short range, zero-in at 100 yards. But, for long-run shooting at big game, most experienced shooters zero-in around three inches high at 100 yards.

From a refreshed position, fire three rounds at the goal. Notice the focal point of the purposes of effect on the objective and modify the windage and elevation screws as expected to convey the purpose of a plan to the desired relationship to the points of effect. The point of impact moves toward the path demonstrated on the adjustment and by the amount indicated. Repeat as needed.

The changes are balanced in minutes of the point. One snapshot of the point is almost 1 inch at 100 yards. To calculate the click an incentive at separations other than 100 yards, use the following formula: divide the distance (number of yards) by 100 Then multiply this number by the click value stated on the windage and elevation adjustments. This will tell you the actual click value of the scope at that distance.

Well, these were the basics that you need to know about using the scope for long range shooting. Becoming a long-range shooter is not an easy job. You need to dedicate very to achieve this skill and need practice consistently even to properly use the scope of your rifle.

About the author

Kevin Fleeman

Selfpatron.com is a site dedicated to the sport of hunting. We have a deep respect for nature and for the environment and we therefore take the sport of hunting very seriously. Selfpatron.com provides guides on how to hunt effectively, answer reader questions, and reviews of the latest hunting gear.

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